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CSA Golden Jubilee Frontier Lectures

The Department of Computer Science and Automation was established in 1969 as the "School of Automation". It initially began as a Centre and later acquired the status of a Department. The Department is celebrating its Golden Jubilee Year during August 01, 2019 to July 31, 2020. As part of the Golden Jubilee celebrations, the Department is planning several events and initiatives. One of the initiatives is to organize the “CSA Frontier Lecture Series” to introduce the audience to a wide gamut of research themes in computer science. More details on the Golden Jubilee initiatives will soon be available here.
(Click on the 'Title' to view poster of the talk)


Upcoming Lectures

Series: CSA Golden Jubilee Frontier Lecture Series
Title: High Throughput Computing in the Service of Scientific Discovery

  • Speaker: Prof. Miron Livny, John P. Morgridge Professor of Computer Science Center for High Throughput Computing University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Date and Time: Monday, October 28, 2019, 4:00 PM
  • Venue: Faculty Hall, Indian Institute of Science

Abstract
For more than three decades we have been engaged in translating the potential of distributed computing into effective High Throughput Computing (HTC) software tools. The widely adopted HTCondor distributed resource and job management system that we have developed has facilitated evaluation of novel HTC frameworks and technologies under real-life workloads on production distributed systems. Embracing an experimental approach to our work led to close collaboration with researchers from a wide range of domains. These collaborations contributed to two Nobel prizes in recent years and were instrumental in advancing HTC technologies and practices. For example, the UW-Madison Center for High Throughput Computing delivered in the last 12 months close to 400M core hours to more than 250 projects. The talk will present the principles that have been guiding our work, review our experience in deploying HTCondor in different research computing settings, outline our short term development efforts and review long term HTC challenges.

Speaker Bio:
Miron Livny received a B.Sc. degree in Physics and Mathematics in 1975 from the Hebrew University and M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in Computer Science from the Weizmann Institute of Science in 1978 and 1984, respectively. Since 1983 he has been on the Computer Sciences Department faculty at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where he is currently the John P. Morgridge Professor of Computer Science, the director of the Center for High Throughput Computing (CHTC), is leading the HTCondor project and serves as the principal investigator and technical director of the Open Science Grid (OSG). He is a member of the scientific leadership team of the Morgridge Institute of Research where he is leading the Software Assurance Market Place (SWAMP) project and is serving as the Chief Technology Officer of the Wisconsin Institutes of Discovery. Dr. Livny's research focuses on distributed processing and data management systems and involves close collaboration with researchers from a wide spectrum of disciplines. He pioneered the area of High Throughput Computing (HTC) and developed frameworks and software tools that have been widely adopted by academic and commercial organizations around the world.

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Past Lectures

Series: CSA Golden Jubilee Frontier Lecture Series
Title: Shuffling Chromosomes, Chasing Kangaroos and Other Mathematical Curiosities

  • Speaker: Prof. Prasad Tetali Regents’ Professor, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, USA
  • Date and Time: Thursday, August 22, 2019, 4:00 PM
  • Venue: Faculty Hall, Indian Institute of Science

Abstract
This popular-level lecture will focus on some modern applications of the classical topic of Markov chains. The mixing time of a Markov chain measures the time to get close to the equilibrium distribution of the chain. After introducing the topic briefly, the speaker will address a few surprising applications of Markov chain mixing times. These range from cracking ciphers and modelling chromosomal mutations to solving the discrete logarithm problem (using Pollard’s kangaroos), of particular relevance to digital security. The lecture is expected to be self-contained.

Speaker Bio:
Prof. Prasad Tetali is a Regents’ Professor in the School of Mathematics and the School of Computer Science at Georgia Institute of Technology. Dr. Tetali obtained his Ph.D. (1991) from the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences (NYU) after earning an M.S. (1987) from the School of Automation at IISc. His research interests lie in probability, discrete mathematics, algorithms and optimization and he has published more than 110 research articles. He is recognized as a SIAM Fellow (2009) and an AMS Fellow (2012). Dr. Tetali is a former director and a current member of the steering committee of Georgia Tech’s Algorithms and Randomness Center Think Tank (ARC) and has been on the coordinating committee of Georgia Tech’s renowned interdisciplinary Ph.D. program in Algorithms, Combinatorics and Optimization (ACO) for the past two decades. He served as the interim Chair of the School of Mathematics at Georgia Tech during CY 2015-2016. He is currently on the leadership team of the NSF-funded Transdisciplinary Research Institute for Advancing Data Science (TRIAD) at Georgia Tech.

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Series: CSA Golden Jubilee Frontier Lecture Series
Title: The Multi-armed Bandit Problem Revisited

  • Speaker:Prof. P.R.Kumar, Professor and College of Engineering Chair in Computer Engineering Texas A&M University, USA
  • Date and Time: Thursday, August 08, 2019, 4:00 PM
  • Venue: Faculty Hall, Indian Institute of Science

Abstract
We address the classical multi-armed bandit problem, and. exhibit a family of scheduling policies that appear to have the best empirical performance compared to those known in the literature, as well as low complexity. We also establish regret bounds, both in expectation and on sample paths. [Joint work with Xi Liu, Ping-Chun Hsieh and Anirban Bhattacharya].

Speaker Bio:
P. R. Kumar obtained his B.Tech. degree in Electrical Engineering (Electronics) from I.I.T. Madras in 1973, and the M.S. and D.Sc. degrees in Systems Science and Mathematics from Washington University, St. Louis in 1975 and 1977, respectively. From 1977-84, he was a faculty member in the Department of Mathematics at the University of Maryland Baltimore County. From 1985-2011, he was a faculty member in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and the Coordinated Science Laboratory at the University of Illinois. Currently he is at Texas A&M University where he is a University Distinguished Professor, Regents Professor, and holds the College of Engineering Chair in Computer Engineering. Kumar has worked on problems in game theory, adaptive control, stochastic systems, simulated annealing, neural networks, machine learning, queueing networks, manufacturing systems, scheduling, wafer fabrication plants and information theory. His current research focus includes renewable energy, smart grid, security, privacy, automated transportation, unmanned aerial vehicle traffic management, wireless networks, 5G, cyber-physical systems, control theory, information theory, stochastic systems, and operations research. Kumar is a member of the National Academy of Engineering of the USA, the World Academy of Sciences, and the Indian National Academy of Engineering. He was awarded an honorary doctorate by the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (Eidgenossische Technische Hochschule) in Zurich. He received the IEEE Field Award for Control Systems, the Donald Eckman Award of American Automatic Control Council, the Fred Ellersick Prize of IEEE Communications Society, the Outstanding Contribution Award of ACM SIGMOBILE, the Infocom Achievement Award, and a SIGMOBILE Test-of-Time Paper Award. He is an ACM Fellow and a Fellow of IEEE. He was a Guest Chair Professor and Leader of the Guest Chair Professor Group on Wireless Communication and Networking at Tsinghua University, Beijing, China. He is an Honorary Professor at IIT Hyderabad. He is a D. J. Gandhi Distinguished Visiting Professor at IIT Bombay. He was awarded the Distinguished Alumnus Award from IIT Madras, the Alumni Achievement Award from Washington University in St. Louis, and the Daniel C. Drucker Eminent Faculty Award from the College of Engineering at the University of Illinois.

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